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Showing posts from 2014

Merry Christmas To All Henry the Young King Readers!

To all Henry the Young King's readers. Greeting! Our blog is taking a break until 6 January, so let me wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year (hopefully full of Henry the Young King)! Here you can find my text about where and how Christmas was celebrated at the courts of Henry and his family, and here the one about Henry the Young King December anniversaries over the years. I would like to recommend a brilliant post about how Christmas was celebrated in medieval England by Professor Sarah Peverly here.

Special Christmas wishes to our friends, Ms Sharon Kay Penman, Ms Marsha Lambert, Ms AnerjeMs. Joan BattistuzziMs Kathryn Warner, Ms Gabriele Campbell, Mr Richard Willis, Mr Malcolm Craig and Mr Valentino Krizanić.  
Stay warm and safe. Hopefully we won't have to suffer what Henry and his consort, Marguerite were through on the Christmas night of 1172, when "a thunder was heard in Ireland and England and in all of France generally, Sudden and dire, portending som…

Henry the Young King Recommendations

Dear Henry the Young King Readers, His Majesty's loyal servant and scribe has slipped on the icy pavement and had her hands badly bruised, hence the minor delays in writing and posting. Don't worry - she keeps the new posts coming even if only in her head :-). Now she has a request to make: there are a few of her Henry the Young King posts to be read or re-read. Firstly, Charming, Vain, Idle Spendthrift in which she made a heroic try to take a closer look at Henry's character; secondly, as the 7 and 8 December marked the anniversary of Henry's parents' crossing to England to be crowned king and queen on 19 December 1154, her last year's post about the ceremony here and the opening chapter of Ms Elizabeth Chadwick's novel, The Winter Crown, in which Henry the Young King plays a very important role here :-); thirdly, to learn what Henry's contemporaries thought about their young lord, here's her post entitled A Lovely Place of Sin.Ms. Marsha Lambert i…

November 1181: Three Sons Bearing Witness to the Fruitfulness of Their Mother

On 1 December 1135, Henry the Young King's great-grandfather King Henry I died. You can read about his death here, in one of my previous posts. Now let me share with you a special snippet of Ralph of Diceto's Images of History. Why do I find it so very special, you may wonder. There are a few things that have caught my attention and are well worth discussing here. Over to Ralph...
Philip count of Flanders, when he heard how Philip king of France and Henry king of England were so closely associated, raised up as many of the Flemings as he could to fight against his liege lord... having no regard for the tender age of his lord the king and quite unmindful of the assurances he had given to King Louis that he would watch over, protect and guide his son according to what is right, attacked Noyon aith as large force as he could muster. They devastated the area around Senlis, demolishing houses and uprooting vineyards. Young King Henry, son of the elder king, Richard duke of Aquitaine …

Henry the Young King's N&N: Nephews and Namesakes

On 16 November 1272, after a long and eventful, albeit not very successful reign, Henry the Young King's nephew and namesake, Henry III, the king of England, died aged 65. Just a reminder here: it is Henry the Young King, who should be counted as Henry III. His contemporaries, mainly chroniclers, when writing about him actually used this numeric name. This however did not last. Was it Henry's somehow anomalous position as a co-ruler, who, despite having been crowned twice had no opportunity to rule independently and what's worse, predeceased his father, or just lack of basic mathematical skills shown by later historians? I am afraid we will never know. Anyway, it was Henry's nephew, who was to go down in history as Henry III and the anniversary of his death pushed me into writing this somehow belated post :-)


A 13th-century depiction of Henry III's coronation (source: Wikipedia)

All together Henry the Young King had four nephews named "Henry". Each of them…

Henry the Young King Says Thank You!

7 November marked the second anniversary of our blog. We have survived in the blogosphere. Hooray! Of course this would not be possible without all the wonderful people we have met. I would like to thank my dear husband Piotrek for his love and and unwavering support; Ms Marsha Lambert for being our Guardian Angel; Ms Anerje, Ms Joan BattistuzziMs Gabriele C. and Ms Donna Schleifer for their lovely and thought-provoking comments; Ms Kathryn Warner for her encouragement, kind support and fresh approach to writing about history; Ms Sharon Kay Penman and Ms Elizabeth Chadwick for my renewed interest in Henry and his tempestuous family; Mr Richard Willis for inviting me and Henry to his blog (and my first offiicial post on Henry), his friendly words of advice and our chats about the Angevins; Ms Emilie Laforge, who has become Henry's godmother; Ms Stephanie Ling and Mr Ken John for all the links and recommendations; also Mr David Parr, Ms Maria Grace, Mr David PillingMr Darren Bak…

Bloggiversary or How Henry the Young King Blog Turned Two...

Today marks the second anniversary of Henry the Young King blog! Long Live the King! Even if he is not counted among England's monarchs. I started to run our household exactly two years ago, on 7 November 2012, posting about Henry at the coronation of his brother-in-law, Philippe Capet [later Auguste]. And here we are- jauntily conquering blogosphere. To celebrate the joyous occasion I have invited our friend, Ms Joan Battistuzzi, who is going to tell us about her stay in England and places related to Henry the Young King and his family. She paid a visit to York, for instance, where the Treaty of Falaise was confirmed on 10 August 1175in a grand ceremony, with William I of Scotland paying homage to both Henry the Young King and Henry II, and to Westminster Abbey, where the first coronation of Henry the Young King took place on 14 June 1170, officiated by Roger of Pont-l'Eveque, Archbishop of York. 

The Young King subsequently established his household in Winchester, employing W…

Edward II's Twelfth-Century Ancestry: A Guest Post by Ms Kathryn Warner

I am delighted to welcome Ms Kathryn Warner, who is currently doing a blog tour to promote her book on Edward II and has kindly agreed to be our guest today. Ms Warner's book, Edward II: the Unconventional King has been published by Amberley Publishing. In this post Ms Warner discusses the twelfth-century ancestry of Edward II, his great-great-uncle Henry the Young King included.

Edward II's Twelfth-Century Ancestry
King Edward II was born in Caernarfon, North Wales on 25 April 1284, as the youngest child of Edward I and his first, Spanish wife Eleanor of Castile.  He was at least their fourteenth child, perhaps fifteenth or sixteenth, and the only one of their four sons to reach adulthood; his elder brothers were John (1266-1271), Henry (1268-1274) and Alfonso (1273-1284), the latter named after their uncle Alfonso X of Castile.  Of Edward's numerous older sisters, only five, Eleanor, Joan, Margaret, Mary and Elizabeth, survived childhood.  Edward succeeded his father as ki…

The Wedding at Newbourg and Other November Anniversaries

Happy 854th Wedding Anniversary to Henry the Young King and Marguerite of France, who (were) married on 2 November 1160, at Newbourg, Normandy, with the sanction of Henry of Pisa and William of Pavia, the papal legates. The sad thing is that Henry's father, king Henry II, whose ambitions seemed boundless, deprived his son and his daughter-in-law of the memories of their Big Day. "How?" you may ask... after all there was nothing unusual about their arranged marriage. The answer is simple: on 2 November 1160 the bridegroom was five and the bride two years old. In the age of marriage contracts and early marriages among the nobility, young age of a bride was the order of the day, still the age of both Henry and Marguerite sparked disputes among their contemporaries, after all, as Roger of Howden put it,: "they were but little children crying in their cradle." But Henry II himself did not share the popular sentiment and little wonder, Marguerite brought the Norman V…