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The Lens of History: Guest Post by Author Mark Richard Beaulieu

Today I am delighted to welcome author Mark Richard Beaulieu to the blog. He has kindly agreed to share his thoughts and impressions about Henry the Young King biography by Professor Matthew Strickland, with a particular regard to Henry the Young King's marriage.
The Lens of History
The upbringing of Lord Henry, the son who would struggle to succeed King Henri II, proves grounds to contrast the method of writing a historical biography with the method of researching a historical recreation of a life. The many sources Kasia cites in her distinguished blog of the Young King, underly my series about Eleanor of Aquitaine. The latest and greatest source of her advocacy on Henry is Professor Matthew Strickland’s definitive “Henry the Young King 1155-1183,” 472 pages of which 145 pages are notes, bibliography and index. It is excellent reading and written with some vivid verbs. In my writing, I care as much about history as understanding how people come to be, and of course, I allow Henry …

Fornham Revisited

‘[The earl of Leicester] … came with his army to a place near St Edmund’s, which is known as Fornham, situated on a piece of marshy ground, not far from the church of St Genevive. On his arrival being known, the earl, with a considerable force, and Humphrey de Bohun with three hundred knights, soldiers of the king, went forth armed for battle to meet the earl of Leicester, carrying before them the banner of St Edmund the king and martyr as their standard' (The Annals of Roger de Hoveden, p. 375)               Bury St Edmunds. Abbey Gate, rebuilt in the 14th century. Photo courtesy of Rambling Man (wikipedia.org)
Yesterday marked the 843rd anniversary of the Battle of Fornham, one of the most decisive battles of Henry II's reign. I posted about the momentous events of 17 October 1173 a few years ago, but in the light of what Professor Strickland writes about it in his Henry the Young King biography it is hard not to mention this severe blow to Henry the Young King's cause yet…

950 Years after Hastings...

“A fatal day for England, a melancholy havoc for our dear country brought about by its passing under the dominion of new lords”. Since these "new lords" mentioned by William of Malmesbury were Henry the Young King's ancestors it is hard not to mention them on this memorable day when the most famous battle in English history was fought and Henry the Young King's great-great-grandfather emerged victorious from it. We are well aware that had Duke William lost there would have been no Henry the Young King, no Richard Coeur de Lion, no Geoffrey of Brittany and our blog would have never come into existence, still we cannot help it and our hearts go for those behind the shield wall on Senlac Hill and for their King. Hopefully, our Liege will forgive us this one day transgression :) There are a few interesting articles about the battle itself and its main participants we would like to recommend. Firstly, a detailed description of what happened on 14 October 1066 icluding part…