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Ms. Sharon Kay Penman and One Fashionable Lock

Happy Birthday to Ms. Sharon Kay Penman, my favourite author of historical fiction, who was born on August 13. Ms. Penman has brought the Young King vividly to life in her Devil's Brood and I consider myself incredibly lucky to have had the opportunity to meet her Hal- as the Young King is called in the novel- and Ms. Penman herself, the experience that made me return to the long-forgotten Angevin domains. I developed an interest in Eleanor, Henry and their tempestuous family in my late teens- then I also met their eldest surviving son- but later somehow left their realm for eleven years! Ms. Penman's novel Time and Chance, which I came across purely by chance, was a driving force behind my return. I felt deeply honoured and extremely excited when she started to reply to my comments on her brilliant blog and this hasn't changed, for every single word, every e-mail written to me makes me feel like a child receiving a long-awaited Christmas gift. There would never be enough "Thank you!" to express my gratitude. Happy Birthday!


Henry the Young King has had a special brithday charter issued  for Ms. Penman on the occasion. Let me quote:

Henry, by the grace of God, King of England, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou (aka Hal), to my fair Lady Sharon, greeting. Know that  I have conceded and granted, and by my present charter confirmed that on the occasion of your brithday you receive one of my Salisbury mews and one of my gyrfalcons for mentioning "one lock allowed to curl fashionably" on to my forehead, my "vivid blue eyes" and "the stylish pointed cup with a turned-up brim embroidered in gold thread" (Devil's Brood, Chapter Two, p.19, UK edition).

Happy Birthday! 


                       Ms. Penman's youngest fan, Helenka (aged one)

Note: Here are two wonderful reviews of Devil's Brood by Ms Cristina Beans Picón and by Mr John Hinson. Highly recommendable.

Comments

  1. Dear Kasia.....this is so lovely & touching!

    warmest wishes,
    Joan

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  2. Birthday Greetings to Sharon Penman. It's wonderful to be inspired to re-visit an old fav:)

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    1. Indeed, Anerje! And I purchased Time and Chance purely by CHANCE :-)

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  3. Hello, dear Kasia. What a lovely post. For some reason I didn't get the email about this post till today. I will share on fb and am very sorry it will be a bit late for Sharon's birthday. Take care. xx

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    1. Thank you, dear Marsha, but I didn't send any e-mails. Don't worry, I wished Sharon "Happy Birthday!" on her blog and I was on time :-)




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  4. Whoo hoo - I am right there with you on your opinions of Sharon!

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    Replies
    1. That's the best thing about it, isn't i? So many people united by the pen of Ms. PENman :-)

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  5. Kasia, what a lovely birthday gift. I just wish you could have delivered it in person! Going to Australia is currently at the top of my Bucket List, but meeting you in Poland is now on that list, too. The Young King is very lucky to have you as his champion.

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    1. I'm deeply honoured, Sharon! Thank you for everything, but especially for enriching my life.

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  6. I was just thinking about you yesterday, Kasia. What a lovely post!

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    1. Thank you, dear Stephanie! As far as I remember I owe you an e-mail :-) We're going to the seaside tomorrow, but I promise to write a few words upon our return (and send the pics).

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    2. Kasia, you are way ahead of the game when it comes to emails and my own initiative. Enjoy your seaside! We are actually taking a train out to the west coast to visit my sister. We leave tonight and will be gone for a week. I hope your day goes well and that your children (and you) enjoy themselves!

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  7. This is wonderful, Kasia! I love "Hal"'s proclamation for Sharon:-)!

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  8. I wanted to add something on a merrier note :-) Thank you for your lovely comment, Donna!

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  9. The picture of your youngest wasn't there yesterday - she looks adorable - and also has a look of mischief about her;)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Anerje! I decided to take a risk and include the photo.

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