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17 October 1173: Battle of Fornham

Today marks the 841st anniversary of the Battle of Fornham, as some historians say, the most decesive battle in Henry II's reign and as I say, the most humiliating defeat in Herny the Young King's Great Revolt. It was fought in England, near Bury St Edmunds, on 17 October 1173, the same year the well known Jocelin of Brakelond entered the monastery. Take a look at my last year's post about the battle and the events surrounding it here. Note that most unusually there was a woman actively involved, fully armed, fighting alongside the men (the latter must have been genuinely shocked at her brazen behaviour ;-)). You can read about this D&D (daring and determined) lady here.

Both Ms Sharon Kay Penman and Ms Elizabeth Chadwick have given a vivid description of the battle in their novels, Devil's Brood and The Time of Singing respectively.

Additionally, we have a cause for celebration. Today's post is our 100th Henry the Young King post. Hurrah! Grasping the opportunity I would like to thank all those who actively support our Henry the Young King blog. Many thanks to Ms Marsha Lambert, Ms Joan Battistuzzi, Ms Maria Grace of Random Bits of Fascination, Ms Anerje, the champion of Piers Gaveston, Ms Gabriele Campbell from the Lost Fort, Ms Gocho from Portal Strategie and Ms Ellen of Historical Ragbag, who has kindly mentioned our Lesser Land in her brilliant post on royal deaths. As always we are grateful to Ms Sharon Kay Penman, Ms Elizabeth Chadwick and Ms Kathryn Warner for their encouragement and kind support. Special "Thank you!" to Mr Malcolm Craig for being my Friend in 11th and 12th Century History.


Comments

  1. Congratulations on your 100th post. Thank you for the kind mention. A brilliant blog deserves every recognition and I am most happy to spread the word. I am sorry I am a day late in posting. For some reason I don't get your email notification of a new post on the day but a day late. I will share on facebook as usual. Take care, dear friend. xx

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  2. Congratulations on the Young King's 100 th post! I'm sure he would be delighted having a blog devoted to him all these years later! And thanks for calling me the champion of Piers Gaveston! Made my day:)

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  3. Kasia, you're love and enthusiasm for The Young King lives in in your writing, Keep up the good work. We all enjoy reading it

    much Love xx <3

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  4. Thank you, Ladies! For both your kind words and kind support.

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  5. Congratulations Kasia! And thank you for the kind mention. How could I not be enthusiastic about your work! You keep coming up with the most creative ways to share young Henry's story with us, plus the stories of those whose lives he touched.

    With much appreciation,
    Joan

    ReplyDelete

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